Revisiting CITS Work with a new knowledge

Since studying up on composition, and what makes an image really stand out to the viewer, I decided to revisit my concepts for Cave in the Sky.

Victim 1: My original Songhellir background, inspired by Maxx’s original image of the same idea.

Galaxy_01_Resized

What’s so wrong with this, you ask? There’s nowhere for the eye to go. I have bright colours on the top half, a white-leaved tree in the lower centre, and an oddly dark cliff to the side that isn’t quite dark enough to be in the foreground. Nothing points to any particular focal point, so it makes the eye struggle to land on one spot and see the picture as a whole.

sonhellircomposition

It could have been an effective use of the rule of thirds, having only the main aspects along the bottom third of the image, however the bright galaxy clusters distract the eye too much towards the top, leaving the viewer confused overall.

sonhellircomposition2

Note: I only JUST noticed the huge chunk missing from where I re-positioned the fox to be further to the right… try to imagine it’s not there? XD

By bringing the tree closer to the viewer, and pushing it further to one corner, it seems to be more of a foreground element that’s leaning into the midground. While this could potentially be bad, the darkness of the cliffs push them closer to us, and the brightening of the leaves pushes the top of the tree slightly further away, creating more of an interesting perspective overall. This, along with the newly-shaped wispy stream, really help to bring the tree into focus. By simply framing the shot better, and adjusting some minor elements, I think I’ve improved the image’s look as a whole.

Next! My original Honey Tree concept:

Now this was a very rough idea that I quickly tried to get down, so that I could let others and myself know what the general plan for this scene was. However, it’s not great, and definitely needed some touch-ups.

Concept_HoneyTree

Once again, I’ve managed to distract the viewer’s eye by putting in too many distracting elements all at once. If I had just had the bear in the image, then this may have actually been really good. Obviously the white colours of the bear and deer contrast greatly to the rest of the warm image.
But with everything in the image being bright, close to the viewer, and just overall messy, it makes it difficult to focus on any one point.

honeytree2

By using the rule of thirds, asymmetrical balance, and a better use of space, I feel like I’ve produced an image here that is much easier on the eye for the viewer. I’ve also tried to make all of the points in the image subtly lead back to the bear, who is by far the brightest point seen.
I also tried to reduce the number of colour variations I had in the scene, as I thought it was overall a bit too much. Instead, I focused on bolder, more fitting colours to really bring out the general feel of the image.
By setting my scene up around a particular focus point, I feel this has become a much better image overall 🙂

Woop!


http://diyvideoeditor.com/shooting-better-home-videos-6/

https://fstoppers.com/architecture/ultimate-guide-composition-part-one-just-say-nokeh-31359

http://digital-photography-school.com/10-landscape-composition-tips-illustrated-with-pictures-from-eastern-washington/

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